Funding Frequently Asked Questions

Will I get funding?
Admission does not guarantee funding, and funding is awarded on a competitive basis. We consider all program applicants for funding. Funding offers may be in the form of fellowships or research / teaching assistantships, or a combination. Both M.S. and Ph.D. applicants are considered for funding, but certain funding opportunities are restricted to Ph.D. students. Offers for assistantships are made starting in late February. The committee uses its aggregate evaluations to select applicants who will be offered Fellowships and graduate assistantships. Requests for funding exceed the funds we have available, so awards are very competitive.

What are the chances that I will get funding if I am an international student?
All applicants who meet the December deadline are considered for funding. Assistantships are awarded competitively with continuation subject to satisfactory performance in the program and the availability of funds. Requests for funding exceed the funds we have available, so awards are very competitive.

What kinds of appointments are there?
Students in the applied economics graduate program may be supported with funds from a variety of sources: fellowships, teaching assistantships, and research assistantships. In general, there are two types of funding appointments awarded by the applied economics graduate program and its participating departments: service appointments and nonservice appointments. Teaching and research assistantships are examples of service appointments. Service appointments require a student to do work for an assigned faculty member. Most commonly, these appointments are quarter- or half-time. Students with a quarter-time appointment are expected to work on average 10 hours per week under the supervision of the assigned faculty member. Students with a half-time appointment are expected to work on average 20 hours per week under the supervision of the assigned faculty member. In addition to a stipend, the typical teaching and research assistantship also offers a health insurance and tuition benefit. Fellowships are typically non-service appointments. Non-service appointments do not carry the same work responsibilities as a service appointment. However, some fellowships may require a student to fulfill other responsibilities, such as attending special seminars and workshops, or working on thesis research.

Do assistantships cover the full cost of attending graduate school?
Research and teaching assistantship stipends for 2012-13 are $18,567 for M.S. students and $21,333 for Ph.D. students on a 12 month, half-time appointment, and $13,666 for M.S. students and $15,701 for Ph.D. students on a 9 month, half-time appointment. Assistantships typically also provide health insurance and tuition benefits, depending upon meeting eligibility requirements.

If you are a graduate assistant with an appointment of at least 25 percent (10 hours per week), you will receive a tuition remission (based on resident tuition rates) equal to twice the percentage of your appointment in the term of the appointment only. If you hold an appointment of 50 percent or more for an entire term, you will receive a 100 percent tuition remission. Nonresident students holding an assistantship of at least 25 percent for an entire term will be assessed tuition at the resident rates.

What does it cost to attend a graduate program at the University of Minnesota?
Information on costs, tuition, & fees and international students are available online.